Go to Top

Blog Archives

Trout Fly Fishing Report January 25, 2016

Delayed Harvest and Large Stocked Trout Streams: The streamer pattern and the technique I discussed last week is very effective now. However, there is one refinement which helps me catch many large trout that are holding in the deepest pools. I use the Scientific Angler Frequency Boost Fly Line WF-4 with the Murray’s Sinking Fluorocarbon 6 foot leader.  By swimming the Shenk’s Black Sculpin Streamer size 8 or Spuddler Streamer size 8 or Shenk’s White Streamer slowly along the streambottom you can catch many of the largest trout. Often the strikes are very gentle in the cold water so if you even suspect you have had a strike, set the hook firmly with both your line hand and rod. Good streams now are the Bullpasture, Big Stoney and the Jackson. Mountain Trout Streams: The mountain trout streams are too cold for good fishing.

Digg thisEmail this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on Tumblr

Trout Fly Fishing Report January 18, 2016

Delayed Harvest and Large Stocked Trout Streams: The recent rains have raised these stream levels and moved many of the trout throughout the streams. This provides great fishing for the anglers who are willing to explore the streams far away from the main roads. A good way to cover this water thoroughly and to catch many trout is to fish sculpin streamers such as Shenk’s Black Sculpin size 8 and Spuddler Streamer size 8 and a chub pattern such as Shenk’s White Streamer size 8. Wade downstream and cast these across stream, after they sink deeply, strip them six inches every ten seconds across the stream bottom. Good streams for this action are the Jackson, Bullpasture and Big Stoney Creek. Mountain Trout Streams: The mountain trout streams are too cold for good fishing.

Digg thisEmail this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on Tumblr

Trout Fly Fishing Report January 11, 2016

Mountain Trout Streams: The mountain trout streams are too cold for good fishing. Delayed Harvest and Large Stocked Streams: Last week I talked about catching trout that are feeding on the surface on adult midges. However, many trout feed on the emerging stage of the midges below the stream surface. The giveaways of this manner of feeding are the swirls and splashed these trout make as they chase the emerging nymph toward the surface of the stream. A productive tactic for these trout is to cast an emerging fly pattern five feet upstream of where you see the feeding trout. Allow it to sink deeply and as it drifts downstream to the trout raise the rod tip slowly to swim the fly up toward the surface of the stream. The strike usually comes when the fly is within a foot of the surface. Productive flies are the Mr. Rapidan Olive Soft Hackle Nymph size 16, Brassie size 18 and Bead Head Copper John Zebra size 18.  Back Creek, Big Stoney Creek and Passage Creek all have good winter midge hatches.

Digg thisEmail this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on Tumblr

Trout Fly Fishing Report January 4, 2016

Mountain Trout: The mountain trout streams are too cold for good fishing. Delayed Harvest and Large Stocked Trout: I am seeing many fish feeding on adult midges in these streams in the evenings in the flat pools. These trout are very wary so wade very carefully, go to 7X leaders and fish one-on-one to the rising trout. Fight them away from the other rising trout and release them gently in the tail of the pool and you may be able to catch several other rising trout out of that same pod. My favorite dry flies for this fishing are the Mr. Rapidan Midge Dry size 18, Griffiths Gnat size 18 and Murray’s Little Dark Stonefly Dry size 18. Passage Creek, Big Stoney Creek and Back Creek all have good midge hatches.

Digg thisEmail this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on Tumblr